teaseon:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow the Ultrafacts Blog!

The whole compiled list of useful links. More is to come! Follow today!

Here’s more!

lovelycharts.com – create flowcharts, network diagrams, sitemaps, etc.
e.ggtimer.com – a simple online timer for your daily needs.
coralcdn.org – if a site is down due to heavy traffic, try accessing it through coral CDN.
random.org – pick random numbers, flip coins, and more.
google.com/webfonts – a good collection of open source fonts.
homestyler.com – design from scratch or re-model your home in 3d.
join.me – share you screen with anyone over the web.
wetransfer.com – for sharing really big files online.
hundredzeros.com – the site lets you download free Kindle books.
polishmywriting.com – check your writing for spelling or grammatical errors.
marker.to – easily highlight the important parts of a web page for sharing.
whichdateworks.com – planning an event? find a date that works for all.
everytimezone.com – a less confusing view of the world time zones.
gtmetrix.com – the perfect tool for measuring your site performance online.
noteflight.com – print music sheets, write your own music online (review).
imo.im – chat with your buddies on Skype, Facebook, Google Talk, etc. from one place.
translate.google.com – translate web pages, PDFs and Office documents.
kleki.com – create paintings and sketches with a wide variety of brushes.
similarsites.com – discover new sites that are similar to what you like already.
wordle.net – quick summarize long pieces of text with tag clouds.
bubbl.us – create mind-maps, brainstorm ideas in the browser.
kuler.adobe.com – get color ideas, also extract colors from photographs.
ge.tt – qiuckly send a file to someone, they can even preview it before downloading.
tinychat.com – setup a private chat room in micro-seconds.
privnote.com – create text notes that will self-destruct after being read.
draw.io – create diagrams and flowcharts in the browser, export your drawings to Google Drive and Dropbox.
downforeveryoneorjustme.com – find if your favorite website is offline or not?
urbandictionary.com – find definitions of slangs and informal words.
scribblemaps.com – create custom Google Maps easily.
formspring.me – you can ask or answer personal questions here.
sumopaint.com – an excellent layer-based online image editor.
snopes.com – find if that email offer you received is real or just another scam.
typingweb.com – master touch-typing with these practice sessions.
mailvu.com – send video emails to anyone using your web cam.
timerime.com – create timelines with audio, video and images.
stupeflix.com – make a movie out of your images, audio and video clips.safeweb.norton.com – check the trust level of any website.

For more posts like this, follow the Ultrafacts Blog!

5 hours ago with 577,972 notes | reblog

#ref

motionjessinwhite:

anotherpunk:

"Your dress is too short."

Thanks, the designer used your dick for inspiration.

OH MYG OD

5 hours ago with 178,498 notes | reblog

untexting:

some people’s selfie game is so strong that makes me feel uncomfortable

5 hours ago with 270,561 notes | reblog

trebled-negrita-princess:

theuppitynegras:

I love vintage stuff but I’m so glad I can enjoy them in the 21st century with my iphone, wifi and slightly more human rights 

somebody gets it.

5 hours ago with 266,831 notes | reblog

tardiscrash:

crowley-for-king:

to-boldly-go-down-on-me:

The idea that nerds are awkward and don’t ever socialize is the stupidest stereotype ever because like

Have you ever seen two nerds together?

HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A CONVENTION?

Give us a topic of a common interest and we’ll socialize way past what normal people can tolerate.

Just because we don’t want to talk to you doesn’t mean we don’t want to talk.

5 hours ago with 159,219 notes | reblog

peble:

did i actually save or did i imagine it? better save eleven more times

5 hours ago with 441,252 notes | reblog

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

5 hours ago with 137,948 notes | reblog

dersekingdom:

dersekingdom:

Dave Strider.

Excuse u this needs more notes. This is Dave strider were talking about here

5 hours ago with 64 notes | reblog

nivalingreenhow:

when McGonagall finds out that Ginny is pregnant, and that the Weasley and Potter bloodlines will converge, she marks on her calender the day the child will turn 11 and that is the day she retires 

5 hours ago with 79,204 notes | reblog

tehrisa:

whoops wrong charm point

breast stroker sounded better in my head tbh

5 hours ago with 3,089 notes | reblog